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We understand... you and your dog you and your cat now is the time to register your dog desexing cats leads to less unwanted kittens that every dog can bite that Good owners lead to good dogs that good cats have purrfect owners

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Desexing process

Desexing can only be carried out by a qualified veterinary surgeon, and is a routine procedure performed under general anesthetic.

The Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 defines desexing as:

desex means to permanently render an animal incapable of reproducing (and desexed has a corresponding meaning).

Procedure

For female dogs, it involves the removal of the ovaries and the uterus via a small incision 5 -10cm long either along the abdomen or the flank (the side of the abdomen). For male dogs, it involves the removal of both testicles through a 2-3cm incision just in front of the scrotum. A tattoo can be placed on the inside of your dog’s ear to signify it has been desexed.

Your vet will attend to the post-operative requirements of your dog and normally dogs are ready to go home a few hours after the procedure. Your vet will also give you detailed advice on how to properly care for your dog at home in the days following surgery.

Exemptions

Vets may grant an exemption based on it posing an undue risk to the health of the dog or cat or adversely affecting the growth, development or wellbeing of the dog or cat. The exemption is logged by the Vet against the dog or cat’s record in Dogs and Cats Online. If the dog or cat has not yet been entered into Dogs and Cats Online, the Vet will create a new record.

Certificate of desexing

If your dog has been desexed, but you do not have a desexing certificate or other acceptable written evidence, you will need to arrange a vet of choice to examine the animal and provide a written statement of their professional opinion in relation to the dog or cat’s neutered status.

By law, only a registered veterinary surgeon can desex a dog or cat

Contact your local vets to ascertain the procedural options and costs.

The National Desexing Network has a low cost desexing application and a directory of participating vets in South Australia.  www.ndn.org.au/apply-for-low-cost-desexing.html

Councils offer a registration rebate for ‘standard dogs’, which is a dog that is both microchipped and desexed.

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